Monday, May 26, 2014

Tiny Houses and Fat People






People suckered by this stuff, don't realize it is the doing of Agenda 21 and elites who will still want 1500 dollars a month for your "green" micro-apartment. The biggest place I have ever lived in as an adult is 830 square feet and my other apartments and rented rooms were far smaller. At least 6 years of my life, I lived in one room or two rooms. It's amusing to me to watch liberals "sell" downgraded lifestyles. Surely the elite in their tens of thousand square feet mega-mansions are laughing at the riff-raff. Shacks are now in vogue. Unlike the last depression where people glued on newsprint on to their shack walls, now they are "saving the planet" to build their new home out of shipping and milk crates.


 

One thing I think about, what about being fat in one of those places? Half of those "homes" I wouldn't fit through the door, or in their mini-kitchens. Not all of us have the mobility to climb up 10 feet to a sleeping loft. Already the hallways of my apartments are too small, I have to walk sideways to get through my bathroom already. My wheelchair and walker get banged up just going around the corner, so they want us living in even smaller places? As much as these folks glamorize small house living, I've been involuntarily downscaled the majority of my life. The living off the grid part is a positive, and some other attributes--no mortgage, but the tiny house movement is suspect to me, also for us fat people, we definitely are not going to be living lives of quality squashed into a house the size of a trash dumpster.

14 comments:

  1. Was it PT Barnum that said there's a sucker born every minute? Last year I think the fad was to have cellulite sucked out of their rear ends and injected in their lips was it not?

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  2. The "green" thing sure is a marketing scam. Moi-ha-ha-ha-ha! Let's unload these puny shacks under the disguise of social consciousness. You know what else is a "green" micro-apartment? A recycled cardboard box in a city park.

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    1. It is a scam. The elites want to own and control more of the world's resources and telling people they must be managed to "save" the environment is working well for them. The social consciousness in the field we know is a joke as they give far less expecting more. LOL about a cardboard box being "green", you made me crack up with that one.

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    2. I've lived in a cardboard box. For about 2 weeks in early spring. I've been inside a few of these tiny homes. They are well insulated, with electricity, running water, satellite tv and appliances/furniture and are sometimes mobile, like RVs. They are not anything like a cardboard box.

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    3. It's true they are an upgraded cardboard box for the rich.

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  3. I purchased a condo over 10 years ago, that I no longer own, but that little 600 square foot box is now worth close to triple I paid. In that time minimum wage has increased 50 cents. In the 2 years I have had my current apartment, it has gone up $800 a year. When I asked my landlord about my second increase, he said this one is ONLY $30 a month. The jerk raised my rent to the max allowable each year and the first year I lived without heat and had to take him to court. A cardboard box is looking better everyday.

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    1. I know isn't it interesting how wages are remaining stagnant while housing skyrockets? Soon they will price everyone out of having a home. For all the people who say the market adjusts itself, well all these little tiny house people are working against that aren't they? The poor can just go live in their little coffins. I saw some guy building these things that were maybe 2 feet bigger then coffins for homeless people to "live" in, no thanks. Wow that is some big rent increases. We have 30-50 dollar increases, I do get scared of getting priced out of here, of course the money coming in never goes up. Disability is worth less and less with inflation. And they refused any cost of living increases for 3 years. I would not pay rent in place without heat. Praying neither of us end up in a cardboard box. I know where the homeless shelter is in town, the worse most dangerous area and when I have driven by it 1/8th of it got burned out.

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  4. I noted this "Small Home" movement awhile ago and knew even if I could afford one or wanted to be "eco-conscious" it wouldn't work for me either. And it's a fad, a niche market much like the "Gnome" type houses I've seen. Cute, but not practical for me either.
    As I get older, I've been down-sizing considerably for a variety of reasons, chief among them is both practicality and medical stuff. When I was last looking for a place to live I was very open minded: I didn't care if it was new and modern or old and funky but *not* "in town." Thinking ahead it had to be handicapped accessible-just.in.case. Since we have no public transportation, I had to be close enough to town to be able to get cab service just.in.case. I'm dealing with medical stuff that is unpredictable, but ultimately progressive. When I found this place, I was thrilled: Outside of town, forest on three sides, a river across the road. Access from the driveway is flat. Inside, all the floors are flat, no thresholds (it has in-floor radiant heat), all the doorways are wide enough to accommodate a wheel chair and the bathroom is entirely handicapped accessible. It's not inexpensive (proportionately I'm paying way too much for my total income) but I was more than willing to make cuts in other areas of my budget to live here.
    My ultimate hope is to age in place right here and leave here for the last time in the prone position. It *is* difficult to find a place that's truly handicapped accessible and I realize how fortunate I am to even have found this place. Where you live has such an effect on your whole outlook-at least it does for me. I've kidded with my best friend that I'll starve to death before I leave here-but only half in jest: When you spend a lot of time in your home, it's great to have a place to live that you really love: IMO, that's what really makes it "home." All that looking over a few years was well worth while for me.
    TW

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    1. It wouldn't be practice for me either. I can imagine the endless injuries I'd have banging my large lipedema body in all those nooks and crannies. I notice most of the people who live in those things are thin. One in the video lived behind a relative's house. How much you want to bet she spends most of her time in the relatives house and just sleeps in her little box. That makes things a little bit different if you can go sack out in your Mom or sister's family room in front of the wide screen TV just 100 feet from your mini-porch.

      I fear elevators and cant do stairs, so I need flat areas. I had to search for apartments here forever to find something suitable. Because we are poor and car could break down, I need to be within the scope of Dial a Ride and paratransit, no country living for me but glad you can get cab. That is great you found a flat place that is really wheelchair accommodating. If I get bad off enough where I can't walk without cane, I know my walker does not fit around the corners in here or my bathroom. Yes you found something very exceptional, and you should keep it and age in place. I pay far more rent then most people of our income to live in a safe area, I had too many years in the dangerous ghetto areas, and I buy peace and scenery myself though it is a sacrifice. You are right your whole outlook is affected. So the people around me are far more affluent but there is a lot of things I have, good scenery and peace and quiet, the walls here have some thickness to them. Yes stick it out there, that sounds great. :)

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  5. Oh those pouty lips, so ugly, they look like fish, Wonder if any had to get that undone. Yes there is a sucker born every minute.

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  6. A very expensive backyard playhouse. I can't see how that costs her ten thousand dollars, especially with doing the work herself and finding some of the building materials in dumpsters. And no plumbing! I would be embarrassed spending so much for so little.

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  7. Reminds me of the trailer my grandparents would use when visiting their kids. They liked that they could sleep in their own bed, get up on their own schedule (5am) and have breakfast without waking anybody up. They'd also live in the trailer in the summer out on the coast. Grandma also liked that she could clean the trailer in less than half the time she'd use to clean her house - but then again she was happy to be back in the (insulated) house by winter!

    I have started suggesting we move to a more accessible "aging in place"-style home sometime in the next 10-20 years.

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  8. It is about the size of a trailer isn't it. Maybe one of those small silver ones, Arrowstreams? Is that what kind your grandparents had? I hope you can find a good aging in place home. I wouldn't mind vacationing in trailer that was accessible to my body, few are, of that size but not living in it. LOL

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